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Posts tagged ‘Tomato’

Sardine Toasts with Tomato Mayonnaise and Fennel

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Tomatoes are ‘stroke preventers’

Tomatoes

A tasty way to reduce stroke?

 

A diet rich in tomatoes may reduce the risk of having a stroke, according to researchers in Finland.

They were investigating the impact of lycopene – a bright red chemical found in tomatoes, peppers and water-melons.

A study of 1,031 men, published in the journal Neurology, showed those with the most lycopene in their bloodstream were the least likely to have a stroke.

The Stroke Association called for more research into why lycopene seemed to have this effect.

The levels of lycopene in the blood were assessed at the beginning of the study, which then followed the men for the next 12 years.

They were split into four groups based on the amount of lycopene in their blood. There were 25 strokes in the 258 men in the low lycopene group and 11 strokes out of the 259 men in the high lycopene group.

The study said the risk of stroke was cut by 55% by having a diet rich in lycopene.

‘Major reduction’

Dr Jouni Karppi, from the University of Eastern Finland in Kuopio, said: “This study adds to the evidence that a diet high in fruits and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of stroke.

“The results support the recommendation that people get more than five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, which would likely lead to a major reduction in the number of strokes worldwide, according to previous research.”

He said lycopene acted as an antioxidant, reduced inflammation and prevented blood clotting.

Dr Clare Walton, from the Stroke Association, said: “This study suggests that an antioxidant which is found in foods such as tomatoes, red peppers and water-melons could help to lower our stroke risk.

“However, this research should not deter people from eating other types of fruit and vegetables as they all have health benefits and remain an important part of a staple diet.

“More research is needed to help us understand why the particular antioxidant found in vegetables such as tomatoes could help keep our stroke risk down.”

BBC

Turkish Spinach with Tomatoes and Rice

Some Sephardic Jews have traditionally allowed rice during Passover, whereas many Ashkenazi Jews do not. There isn’t much of it in this Turkish spinach dish, adapted from a recipe in Clifford A. Wright’s “A Mediterranean Feast,” just enough to add substance to the vegetables.

2 pounds spinach, stemmed and washed in 2 changes water, or 1 pound baby spinach

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 can diced tomatoes in juice or, in season, 1 1/4 pound tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped

1 cup chicken stock, vegetable stock, garlic broth or water

2 to 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (to taste)

3 tablespoons long grain or basmati rice, rinsed in several changes of water, or 1/2 cup cooked brown rice

Salt to taste

2 teaspoons paprika

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

3/4 to 1 teaspoon sugar (to taste)

1. Wash the spinach and, working in batches if necessary, steam for about 2 minutes above an inch of boiling water, just until wilted. Remove from the heat and set aside.

2. Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a large, lidded skillet or casserole and add the garlic. Cook, stirring, until it begins to sizzle and smell fragrant, about 30 seconds, and stir in the tomatoes. Cook, stirring often, for 5 to 10 minutes, until the tomatoes have cooked down slightly. Add the stock or water, the lemon juice, rice, salt, paprika, cinnamon, sugar and steamed spinach and bring to a simmer.

3. Cover, turn the heat to low and simmer 15 minutes. Uncover and continue to cook until the mixture has the consistency of a thick stew, about 15 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings. Serve hot or warm.

Yield: 4 to 6 side-dish servings.

Advance preparation: You can steam the spinach 1 or 2 days ahead. This dish makes a great leftover that I enjoyed for 3 days running.

Nutritional information per serving: 167 calories; 8 grams fat; 1 gram saturated fat; 1 gram polyunsaturated fat; 5 grams monounsaturated fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol; 21 grams carbohydrates; 6 gram dietary fiber; 314 milligrams sodium (does not include salt to taste); 7 grams protein

Read More: NYT

Pressed Mozzarella and Tomato Sandwich

No panini press needed: For the easiest Italian lunch, crusty bread, good cheese, and a couple of cans will do just fine. Look for ciabatta bread, bagged or in bins, at the deli or in the bakery section. Its floured, crusty exterior and dense interior are just right for pressed sandwiches.

  • Prep Time 10 minutes
  • Total Time 10 minutes, plus pressing
  • Yield Serves 2

 

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, drained, reserving 1 tablespoon oil
  • 1/2 loaf ciabatta bread (about 5 ounces), split horizontally and hollowed out
  • Romaine lettuce leaves
  • 6 ounces fresh mozzarella, sliced
  • 1/2 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley, leaves
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together mustard and oil until thick; spread on bread. Layer bottom half of bread with some of the lettuce, then cheese, tomatoes, and parsley. Season with salt and pepper. Top with remaining lettuce and bread.
  2. Wrap sandwich tightly in plastic; place on a baking sheet. Top with another sheet, and weight down with canned goods or a heavy skillet. Refrigerate at least 1 hour and up to overnight to meld flavors. Cut in half, and serve.

 

Read More : MarthaStewart

Tomato baked eggs


Eggs over tomato for a change

  • Cook 60 mins
  • Prep 0 mins

Nutrition per serving

204 kcalories, protein 9.0g, carbohydrate 7.0g, fat 16.0g, saturated fat 3.0g, fibre 3.0g, salt 0.27g

Ingredients

Serves 4

  • 2lb ripe vine tomatoes
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 large free range eggs
  • 2 tbsp chopped parsley and/or chives

    Method

    1. Preheat the oven to fan 180C/ conventional 200C/gas 6. Cut the tomatoes into quarters or thick wedges, depending on their size, then spread them over a fairly shallow 1.5 litre ovenproof dish. Peel the garlic, slice thinly and sprinkle over the tomatoes. Drizzle with the olive oil, season well with salt and pepper and stir everything together until the tomatoes are glistening.
    2. Slide the dish into the oven and bake for 40 minutes until the tomatoes have softened and are tinged with brown.
    3. Make four gaps among the tomatoes, break an egg into each gap and cover the dish with a sheet of foil. Return it to the oven for 5-10 minutes until the eggs are set to your liking. Scatter over the herbs and serve piping hot with thick slices of toast or warm ciabatta and a green salad on the side.

 

Read More: GoodFood

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