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Posts tagged ‘CPR’

CPR-trained Singaporeans urged to refresh skills for confidence

File photo: People practice CPR compressions on a mannequin. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images/AFP)

Those who have been trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during National Service have been urged to refresh their skills. Senior Parliamentary Secretary for Manpower and Education Hawazi Daipi explained this will enable them to feel confident in performing CPR.

SINGAPORE: Those who have been trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during National Service have been urged to refresh their skills.

Senior Parliamentary Secretary for Manpower and Education Hawazi Daipi explained this will enable them to feel confident in performing CPR.

He was speaking at a mass CPR training initiative at Republic Polytechnic on Sunday, conducted by the Singapore Heart Foundation.

The project aimed to raise awareness among the community of the need for CPR and automated external defibrillation (AED) training.

The project saw 1,500 participants from schools and corporations come together for the training session.

Organisers of the event said the importance of CPR cannot be underestimated.

The Singapore Heart Foundation said each year, about 1,500 people collapse due to sudden cardiac arrest. Only about 3 per cent of them survive.

The survival rate of such patients decline faster when nothing is done, which is why it is important to ensure more people in the community are CPR-trained.

Mr Hawazi said: “What we can do is to utilise people who have already been trained in the community to be ambassadors or to reach out to others to help identify those who may need training so that more people would be aware of, would have been trained in how to discharge CPR whenever necessary.”

– CNA/xq

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/cpr-trained-singaporeans/702992.html

How to perform CPR and use AED

 

  1. If a person is non-responsive, shake him by the shoulders and ask if he is OK. If he does not respond, call an ambulance and shout for an AED.
  2. Open his airways by tilting the head backwards and lifting the chin upwards. Check for breathing: See if the chest is moving, listen for breathing sounds and feel for breath on your cheek. If there are no signs of breathing, begin chest compressions.
  3. Place your hands in the middle of the victim’s chest and with elbows locked, press hard 30 times. Blow into the mouth twice. Repeat cycle until the AED arrives.
  4. Continue CPR while the AED pads are placed on the victim’s chest. The AED will look for the heart’s electrical rhythm. It will charge if there is at least a chaotic and irregular electrical heart rhythm.
  5. Once charged, the AED will prompt the user to press a button to deliver an electrical shock to jolt the heart.
  6. Continue CPR for a minute, until the AED checks for a rhythm again. Press the button again when prompted.
  7. If the AED does not detect a chaotic and irregular electrical heart rhythm, it will prompt the rescuer to check the patient. If the victim is breathing, turn him to the side in the recovery position which will ensure the airway remains open. If the casualty is not breathing, continue CPR and AED use until an ambulance crew arrives.

AsiaOne –http://yourhealth.asiaone.com/content/how-perform-cpr-and-use-aed

Learn CPR, Rosmah urges women

Keeping to the beat: Rosmah leading participants at the launch of the Felda aerobics programme in Kuala Lumpur. — Bernama
Keeping to the beat: Rosmah leading participants at the launch of the Felda aerobics programme in Kuala Lumpur. — Bernama

KUALA LUMPUR: Women in the country should be knowledgeable about first aid and learn to perform CPR, says the Prime Minister’s wife, Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor.

She said having such skills would enable them to save their family members’ lives in case of an emergency.

“They will know how to handle the situation if their children choke while drinking milk.

“They can apply the technique while waiting for medical personnel or for the ambulance,” she said when launching a Felda aerobics programme which saw 1,000 people taking part here yesterday.

She also launched the Felda Women’s Association (Wada).

Rosmah, who is also Wada patron, said women should take up aerobics. “Exercising can improve one’s physical, psychological and emotional health,” she said. – Bernama

The Star

SGH to start world’s first trial to raise heart attack survival rates


A person practices CPR compressions on a mannequin. (AFP Photo/Getty Images/Justin Sullivan)

 

 

SINGAPORE: Singapore General Hospital will conduct the world’s first trial in combining cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with electric shock here.

The trial aims to improve the survival rates of heart attack patients.

Twenty-three-year-old Samantha Yong suffered a heart attack last year.

But thanks to her husband’s quick action, she recovered with no side effects.

“I think alot of people should know how to administer CPR and how to use the AED because as a first responder, it’s so helpful,” said Ms Yong.

However, she is one of the few lucky ones.

Doctors Channel NewsAsia spoke to said only one in 50 survive heart attacks here.

They attribute it to a number of reasons. Firstly, there is a lack of mandated emergency medical training in Singapore.

Only 20 per cent of Singaporeans are trained in administering CPR, compared to about 40 to 50 per cent of people overseas.

There is also a lack of public awareness about what to do when a heart attack happens which leads to slower reaction times.

“The key to improving survival is actually to be able to do good CPR as well as give early and effective defibrillation, which is electric therapy to the heart,” said Dr Marcus Ong Eng Hock, senior consultant, Department of Emergency Medicine, SGH.

Presently at hospital A&E departments, electric shocks are given only after manual CPR is performed.

So to improve survival rates, Dr Ong and his team will administer electric shocks during a patient’s CPR upstroke phase.

The team is encouraged by other results of studies done on animals.

“In animal studies, we found that by synchronising defibrillations and compressions, we are able to increase the likelihood of success by 20 per cent. So that is what we are hoping to test in this research,” said Dr Ong.

The study involving 140 patients starts in April.

CNA/cc

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