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Posts tagged ‘antioxidant’

Hot Peppers Could Help You Live Longer

By Claire Nowak, RD.com

Good news, spicy food lovers. You may outlive the rest of us.

Hot peppers are the unofficial superfood we all need. They help you lose weightjumpstart metabolism, and stimulate endorphins as a proven aphrodisiac. And based on a new study, they harness one more superpower: immortality.

Okay, it’s not that drastic, but hot peppers may be able to increase your lifespan. Researchers from the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont found that the consumption of hot red chili peppers (not to be confused with the Red Hot Chili Peppers) is associated with a 13 per cent lower risk of death, especially concerning deaths caused by heart disease or stroke.

These findings are based on 23 years’ worth of data collected from more than 16,000 Americans. Those who ate any amount of hot red chili peppers, excluding ground chili peppers, were considered chili pepper consumers. After 23 years, the death rate of pepper-eaters (21.6 per cent) was lower than the death rate of participants who did not eat the peppers at all (33.6 per cent).

The authors behind this study aren’t sure why chili peppers could delay death, but it could have something do to with capsaicin (the primary component of chili peppers) and its receptors in the body called TRP channels. Capsaicin improves digestion, has antioxidant properties that fight infections, and may fight cardiovascular disease. Certain types of TRP channels may protect against obesity.

So the next time you’re debating what kind of salsa to buy, opt for the hottest flavour. It could give you some extra time on this lovely planet of ours.

source: https://www.readersdigest.ca/food/healthy-food/hot-peppers-reduce-death-risk/

7UP maker sued over antioxidant claims

640_CherrySoda.jpg

 

Dr. Pepper Snapple Group Inc, the maker of 7UP, was sued on Thursday for allegedly misleading consumers over the supposed health benefits of an antioxidant it uses in some varieties of the soft drink.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest, an advocacy group for food safety and nutrition, said the company’s advertising and packaging suggest that the drinks contain antioxidants from blackberries, cherries, cranberries, pomegranates and raspberries, rather than added Vitamin E.

Chris Barnes, a Dr. Pepper Snapple spokesman, in an emailed statement called the lawsuit “another attempt by the food police at CSPI to mislead consumers about soft drinks.”

Antioxidants help protect cells from damage caused by free radicals, which are unstable molecules associated with cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute.

In December 2008, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration objected to labeling in which Coca-Cola Co described its now-discontinued Diet Coke Plus drink as “Diet Coke with Vitamins & Minerals.”

The FDA told the world’s largest soft-drink maker it “does not consider it appropriate to fortify snack foods such as carbonated beverages.”

Barnes said Dr. Pepper Snapple’s label for 7UP Cherry meets FDA regulations, and says the drink does not contain juice. He also said a new formulation of that product, to be available in February, will not contain antioxidants.

Thursday’s lawsuit was filed with the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. It seeks class-action status on behalf of purchasers nationwide of the products, a variety of financial damages, and a halt to the alleged misleading advertising.

The named plaintiff is David Green, a resident of Sherman Oaks, California, who said he would not have bought the soft drinks had he known their antioxidants did not come from fruit.

Dr Pepper Snapple launched 7UP Cherry Antioxidant in 2009. It also sells a diet version of that product, as well as 7UP Mixed Berry Antioxidant and Diet 7UP Mixed Berry Antioxidant, according to its website.

Shares of Dr. Pepper Snapple closed down 30 cents at $43.24 in Thursday trading on the New York Stock Exchange.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/11/09/7up-maker-sued-over-antioxidant-claims/#ixzz2BvDf1GjL

Tomatoes are ‘stroke preventers’

Tomatoes

A tasty way to reduce stroke?

 

A diet rich in tomatoes may reduce the risk of having a stroke, according to researchers in Finland.

They were investigating the impact of lycopene – a bright red chemical found in tomatoes, peppers and water-melons.

A study of 1,031 men, published in the journal Neurology, showed those with the most lycopene in their bloodstream were the least likely to have a stroke.

The Stroke Association called for more research into why lycopene seemed to have this effect.

The levels of lycopene in the blood were assessed at the beginning of the study, which then followed the men for the next 12 years.

They were split into four groups based on the amount of lycopene in their blood. There were 25 strokes in the 258 men in the low lycopene group and 11 strokes out of the 259 men in the high lycopene group.

The study said the risk of stroke was cut by 55% by having a diet rich in lycopene.

‘Major reduction’

Dr Jouni Karppi, from the University of Eastern Finland in Kuopio, said: “This study adds to the evidence that a diet high in fruits and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of stroke.

“The results support the recommendation that people get more than five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, which would likely lead to a major reduction in the number of strokes worldwide, according to previous research.”

He said lycopene acted as an antioxidant, reduced inflammation and prevented blood clotting.

Dr Clare Walton, from the Stroke Association, said: “This study suggests that an antioxidant which is found in foods such as tomatoes, red peppers and water-melons could help to lower our stroke risk.

“However, this research should not deter people from eating other types of fruit and vegetables as they all have health benefits and remain an important part of a staple diet.

“More research is needed to help us understand why the particular antioxidant found in vegetables such as tomatoes could help keep our stroke risk down.”

BBC

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